The White Family – Part 3

(The following was written by Dexter White, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

It was the brother and two grandsons of Alexander White II that were the patriarchs of the three early Grove City area White families. The migration west started soon after the Revolutionary War with Alexander and brother, Sam moving to Hardy County, Virginia in the late 1700s. Many descendants of Sam are still in the area. Next to come to Ohio was William Paxton White, a grandson of Alexander William Paxton arrived in the Grove City area, and married Elizabeth Gantz. She was the first of 14 children of Adam and Catherine Gantz that had settled at the present site of Gantz Park. Alexander II died in Virginia in 1814. His son named George Beavers White had a son named Thomas Benton White that was the third White to migrate to the Grove City area. Thomas B. White married Lydia Gantz, the fifth child of Adam Gantz. The son of Thomas B. was the Edwin White that lived just north of Concord for many years. Dr. A.B. White of Grove City was the son of that Edwin White.

When I was still quite young, I remember the old saying that everyone in Grove City was related to everyone else in Grove City. At that time I did not take it seriously, but after years of research of old census reports, reviewing many books in the State Archives in several states and, looking through the many books written about the early population in this great country of ours, I now realize that, perhaps the old saying had some credence.

(The conclusion of this story in the next blog entry).

The White Family – Part 2

(The following was written by Dexter White, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

Dexter G. White married Laura Jane Clark in Grove City in 1876. Laura was the daughter of Henry Clark of Grove City. The Clark family had lived in Jackson and Pleasant townships as well as Darby Township just south of Harrisburg since before 1800. Henry Clark’s wife was Emily Miller, daughter of Henry and Catherine Miller of Harrisburg. The Millers had come to this country from Germany about 1830, and Henry had gone by the name of Heinrich Mueller in the old country.

My paternal grandfather, Dexter Gantz white, after being born in 1851 and married in 1876 in Grove City, the 1880 census shows him as a living in Jacktown, where he was running a general store. Soon after 1880, he moved to Union County, Illinois, and that is where my father was born. About 1890, Dexter G. moved to Wayne County, Illinois, and then in the mid 1890s came back to Ohio, and lived in a house by the railroad tracks south of Pleasant Corners, at the time of the 1900 census. His wife had died in 1889, and is buried at Concord, as are a lot of the people named in this report. His wife had a sister then was Mrs. Shane Walton. She also died young. Shortly after the 1900 census Dexter G. White sold out in Ohio, packed up the kids and hit the Oregon Trail, never to return to Ohio. He died in Oregon in 1983. Three of his children did return to Ohio within a few years. First was Della White–she married John Mulvaney, and returned. They were the parents of Elvin Mo Mulvaney and Wayne Mulvaney. Second was Charles D. White, he came back prior to 1913, and married Myrtle Ruth Francis. Third was Mary Edith White, she came back and married Jack Davis, he ran the Davis General Store in Harrisburg, and had one daughter, Harriet. Harriet married Bob Greuser.

William Paxton White, the father of Dexter G. White had been born in Virginia in 1824, and migrated to Ohio in the 1840s. He was the son of William Wellington White and wife, Rachel Paxton, both born in New Jersey, and moved to Virginia while still quite young. William W. White had been born in New Jersey in 1784, and was the son of the second Alexander White and wife, Mary Beavers Clifford. Mary was the daughter of Colonel Joseph Beavers of New Jersey and had been married before.

It was this Alexander White that had been a captain in the Revolutionary War, and had paid his men from his own funds, with the promise from the Continental Congress that they would repay him after the war (220 years later, they still have not repaid). He was the son of the first Alexander white, (born MA 1709) and wife Mary McMurtrie, (born MA 1711). The IGI file indicates that Alexander I was the son of Jonathon White (born MA 1653) and his second wife, Margaret Elizabeth Alexander (born MA 1670). Jonathon White was the son of Peregrine White (born on the Mayflower in Cape Cod Bay in November 1620). Peregrine was the son of William White, the pilgrim, signer of the Mayflower Compact.

(The continuation of this story in the next blog entry).

The White Family – Part 1

(The following was written by Dexter White, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

The old farm house where I was born, just south of Pleasant Corners, burned a few years ago, but whenever I go back in that area, I have memories of the Great Depression era in which I grew up.

Driving south from Pleasant Corners looking to the left side of the old 3C Highway, I see the place where Louie Zielgenspeck once lived. Then there is the house where Jake and Minnie Miller lived, with their daughter, Ellen Jane. Next is the house where Carl Miller lived, that is where the William H. Nichols family had lived before him. Next is where the house once stood that was the home of George Francis following his arrival from England in the late 1830s.

George Francis and his wife Ann (Walter) brought their young son, Frederick with them to this country. George was one of the highly educated citizens in the area, and served as census Taker, and in a number of other capacities in the community.

Following the death of George Francis, his son Frederick and wife Elizabeth (Heath) lived in the homestead, and raised their large family there. Their fourth child was Charles Francis, born September 15, 1862. He was my maternal grandfather. Charles Francis and his wife Mary Ellen Nichols moved into that house following the death of Frederick Francis in about 1912, and it was there, in the house on the old Francis farm that I was born in 1926.

My father was Charles D. White, and he married my mother, Myrtle Ruth Francis in March 1913. My mother was the second of three daughters of Charles Francis.

While attending grade school at Harrisburg and high school at Grove City, I was actually attending school with quite a few kids that were related to me, but I did not know it at the time. My father, Charles D. White was born in Union County, Illinois on July 14, 1884. His father was Dexter Gantz White, born in Grove City, Ohio in 1851, the son of William Paxton White, and wife, Elizabeth Gantz. That White family had lived across Rt. 665 from the old Ferguson home place. That house still stands.

(The continuation of this story in the next blog entry).

The Strader-Borror Family Part 2

(The following is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

In 1809, the three eldest sons of Jacob Borror, Jr. (and the widowed Magdalene Strader-Borror came to Jackson Township of Franklin County, Ohio and began clearing the land that had been given to their family by Christopher Strader, Sr., who was living in Ross County, Ohio, at that time. Approximately two years later, Magdalene and her other children moved to the area her sons had cleared. It was this area (now the intersection of Ohio Route 104 and 665) that became known as Borror’s Corners. Borror’s Corners is about twelve miles south of Columbus, Ohio. It was never Incorporated and is not indicated on current maps of Ohio. However, it was clearly marked on maps in the 1800’s.

The seven children of Magdalene Strader-Borror and Jacob Borror, Jr., were Martin, Jacob III, Solomon, Isaac, and Absalom.

The Borror family has been prolific and productive. In 1995, they were 511 listings for Borror in U.S. telephone directories, with 95 in Ohio, 64 in West Virginia, and 47 in Indiana. There are more than 70 descendants of Magdalene Strader-Borror buried at the Scioto Cemetery just south of Borror’s Corners in Franklin County, Ohio, and more than 90 descendants in the Concord cemetery on Route 665 just west of Borror’s Corners. The contributions to the community of the individual Borrors include housewives, teachers, zoologists, biologists, ministers, people in business, military personnel, lawyers, laborers and other occupations needed to fuel a growing metropolitan area.

All of this began with the pioneering efforts of Magdalene Strader-Borror and her seven children. A State Historical marker about Borror’s Corners is located at the crossroads of Routes 104 and 665. This marker was dedicated on Saturday, June 28th at 10:00 a.m. with the dedication being one of the activities of the fifth Great Borror Reunion.

The Strader-Borror Family Part 1

(The following is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

Christopher Strader migrated to Ross County, Ohio, around 1806 and settled in Ross County, near the present town of Austin. The land known as Borror’s Corners was part of an original Grant to Robert Rose, a surgeon in the Revolutionary War. Christopher Strader contracted with Dr. Rose to purchase this land in 1787. As part of the settlement of the Rose Family Estate, a deed for Military District Survey No. 1108 in Franklin and Pickaway County, Ohio was issued to Christopher Strader and his wife. The original survey showed this track is containing 1,200 acres, but by actual measurement was 1,600 acres.

The Strader’s, in turn, deeded portions of this tract to each of four of their children who had not previously been deeded property. These four children, Mary, Jacob, Catherine in the widowed Magdalene Strader-Borror had already settled on the property by 1811. Jacob’s section was the northernmost, about 10 miles south of Franklinton (Columbus).

Christopher Strader died December 21, 1825, and is buried at Strader Hill Cemetery overlooking Austin. His will, probated February 2, 1826, completed the transfer of these land parcels to his children. Magdalene Strader-Borror and her heirs were willed 250 acres, namely the land at Borror’s Corners, she had already been living on for more than fourteen years.

Magdalene Strader had been born in Hampshire County, Virginia, on August 26th, 1767 and married Jacob Borror, Jr., in 1785 in Hardy County, Virginia. Jacob was a Revolutionary War veteran who had been granted a pension of $40.00 a month on January 20, 1786, for his war service in 1781 – 1782. Jacob died on August 11, 1804, from an apparent heat stroke suffered while recovering a deer he had killed. His will left his estate to his widow, Magdalene, and their seven children. Absalom, the seventh child was born December 28, 1804, after Jacob’s death, but it been provided for equally in the will.

(The conclusion of this story in the next blog entry).

The Orders Family History – Part 2

(The following is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. All information below is based on a sketch in the centennial biographical history of Columbus and Franklin County, except for the dates of military service for Jonas (I) and Jonas (II), which are from the Military History of Ohio. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

Allen Orders, the third son and fourth child of Jonas and Sarah, was born on October 22, 1814. He received his schooling locally and was working by his mid-teens. Shortly before his twenty-first birthday, he married Mary Gallion, a native of Virginia. He and Mary lived a year with her parents; then, they rented a farm until 1838 when they bought a one hundred acre tract on the southside of what is now Orders Road (now Fryer Park). Living at first in a log home built by Allen, they constructed a new home in 1844 that stood until the early 1980s. Allen and Mary had seven children (two sons and five daughters). Allen was an active farmer and was interested in the latest Innovations. He was a member of the Whig party in his early years, but became a Republican shortly after that party’s Inception in 1854. Active in local politics, Allen held several Township offices and was often identified with projects helping his local community. When Allen died on his farm in the summer of 1901, he had reached nearly 87 and was the oldest resident of Jackson Township. He had outlived his wife by twenty years and five of his children. Only George W. Orders and Clarinda Orders Borror survived him.

Jonas (II) Orders was born to Allen and Mary on the day after Christmas of 1840. He acquired his education locally and helped with the running of his father’s farm. After the outbreak of the Civil War, Jonas enlisted in the 113th Ohio Volunteer Infantry Regiment on October 12, 1862. By January of 1863, Jonas’s regiment saw its first combat at the Battle of Mills Springs in Kentucky. On September 19 and 20, 1863, the 113th saw heavy action at the Battle of Chickamauga. Jonas was wounded by shell fragments, (which smashed his pocket watch, but that watch probably saved his life). He had recovered sufficiently to take part in the Battle of Missionary Ridge two months later. In the spring and summer of 1864, Jonas took part in the Atlanta Campaign, participating in engagements at Resaca, Altoona, Dallas and Jonesboro. From the fall of Atlanta on September to until December 24, 1864, Jonas and the rest of the 113th marched to the sea, from Atlanta to Savannah. In April 1865, Jonas was involved in some of the last actions of the war at Raleigh and Bentonville, North Carolina, and was present on April 17, 1865 when the last major Confederate Army, the forces of General J.E. Johnston surrendered. He participated in The Grand Review of the victorious Union troops in Washington, D.C. and was discharged with the rank of Corporal on July 16, 1865. After the war, Jonas was a very active member of the Grand Army of the Republic and was a member of the G.A.R. Post 597. Jonas’ brother also volunteered in the war as a member of the 182nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry (enlisted September 7, 1864) and was in the Battle of Nashville. He was discharged on July 7, 1865.

Jonas, and his brother George W. Orders, returned home to a grand family welcome, but that happiness was shattered just two years later when his young wife Millie (Borror) died. He married a second time on June 15, 1873 to Sarah Knagi (or Knagistrand, the Germanborn daughter of Frederick Knagi of Marysville, Ohio). Jonas and Sarah had eight children (two sons and six daughters) before Sarah’s death on July 22, 1890, only five months after the birth of their last daughter. Jonas died on February 21, 1899, at least partially caused by the effects of his war service. The children of Jonas and Sarah were raised by Grace D. Orders, the children’s legal guardian and eldest sister. After raising these children and putting one of them, her brother Clark E. through his medical schooling (Ohio Northern and the University of Louisville), Grace married Alfred Jackson of Madison County in 1906. Their first son, Edward Raymond, was born at the Old Homestead in 1908, the last child of Orders descent to be born there. When Grace and her family moved to begin a new life in Madison County, the history of Orders Family of Orders Road came to an end. Today no descendants of Jonas’s sons live in the area, but many members of his family through his daughters still live in Grove City and southwestern Franklin County.

The Orders Family History – Part 1

The following is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. All information below is based on a sketch in the centennial biographical history of Columbus and Franklin County, except for the dates of military service for Jonas (I) and Jonas (II), which are from the Military History of Ohio. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

The first member of the orders family of Jackson Township in Franklin County came to America in about 1770. Although his first name is uncertain, this man was born in England and married there. After the birth of at least two children in the death of his wife, he immigrated to Virginia with his two sons Job and Jonas (I). Jonas (I), who actually founded the family in this Township, was reared in Virginia and enlisted from Virginia as a member of the Cavalry of the United States Army in 1792 during the first term of George Washington. After several defeats of the U.S. Army by the Indians in the early 1790s, a new American army of 2,500 men was assembled near Pittsburgh under the command of General A. Wayne and proceeded to Cincinnati in the spring of 1793. Jonas Orders was a member of this force, and he underwent several months of training and preparation there in the summer of 1793. Jonah spent the winter of 1793-1794 in training at Fort Greenville and perhaps in the construction of Fort Recovery. In May of 1794, as a member of Wayne’s Army, he participated in the advance of the force northward through western Ohio. After the construction of Fort Defiance, he participated in the Battle of Fallen Timbers on August 20th, 1794 against the forces of Blue Jacket. In the late summer, Jonas was present during the construction of the new Fort Wayne and was probably back at Fort Greenville by November of 1794. The following June he was present at the signing of the Treaty of Greenville which closed Indian warfare in Ohio for nearly 20 years. Jonas’s army service came to an end about 1798.

In 1805, Jonas decided to return to the west and made his way by foot to Ohio. Shortly after arriving in the Franklinton area, Jonas was stricken with a fever and was ill for several months. At about this time, Jonas met Sarah Ford (daughter of Frederick and Margaret Benjamin Ford who had settled here from Maryland), and on January 30, 1806 they were married. They settled on the Fullerton Farm south of Columbus (on modern Route 104). Jonas and Sarah bought their own Farm in 1829 or 1830 (on the south side of Route 665 near the I-71 interchange) and had a family of ten children (seven sons and three daughters).They were members of the Universalist Church. Jonas was active in local affairs, was a founder of Jackson Township in 1815, and a strong supporter of the preservation of the Union during the Civil War era. At the time of his death in 1864 at age 97, he was the oldest man in the county.

(The conclusion of this story in the next blog entry).

The Early Hoover Family – Part 2

(The following is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

John Hoover died in 1840 at the age of 85 years. He and his wife are buried on the Hoover Farm. There is an iron fence enclosing their graves and the G.A.R. has placed a monument as a soldier of the Revolution.

George Hoover, the youngest son of John Hoover, lived in the old home place and was a great Hunter. He killed 500 deer but never a bear. One day he followed bear tracks that led to the George Vansciever farm. He heard the bear and dogs fighting but when he reached the place the bear had fled and the dogs were nearly dead.

Again one dark, rainy night they heard the dogs and a bear having a fight on a bridge in front of the cabin. George, taking his flintlock, his wife and the lantern, started out to kill the bear. The lantern was made of tin with holes punched in the sides and the wind kept blowing out the candlelight so they had to give up. The next day they found the bear’s tracks in the woods but no bear. Their three children, Polly, Margaret and George Washington, were so frightened they hid in a room.

George Washington Hoover, the youngest child, and known as Wash Hoover, lived all his life in the ancestral cabin and raised a fine family of children who contributed much to the well-being of Grove City. Two sons, William and Lewis Hoover were the family doctors of the town and John Hoover was our pharmacist. George farmed the home place. There were also three admirable daughters.

The Early Hoover Family – Part 1

(The following is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

John Hoover, Revolutionary Soldier, early settler of Grove City, and head of the Hoover family for whom the Hoover Road was named, made a bit of history that is worth remembering on Memorial Day.

George Hoover, father of John Hoover, came to this country from Western Germany, having been impressed by the preaching and kindness of William Penn.

One of his sons was John Hoover who, at the age of 21 years, enlisted in 1776 in the Revolutionary Army. He was with Washington in his retreat through New Jersey in November 1776, when many of the soldiers were without shoes. John was with Washington the night he crossed the Delaware, fought in the battles of Trenton and Princeton and helped bury the dead after the Wyoming Massacre.

John Hoover’s name appears twice on two different tablets in Memorial Hall in Columbus, Ohio as a Revolutionary soldier and as first settler of Franklin County.

At the age of 30 years John Hoover married Margaret Smith. She was 20 years old and was also German. In about 1790 they moved to Kentucky before that territory had become a state and lived there nine years until the legalizing of slavery. This being contrary to their convictions, they moved to the free state of Ohio.

John and his wife sold their Kentucky farm, bought some cattle and a horse and made their way to Franklin County where’s some Kentucky friends had settled. They bought 200 acres of land, now known as the Hoover Farm. They discovered later that the man from whom they had bought it did not own it, so they were forced to buy it a second time

On the way here the cattle and horses got away and only one horse was found and that one was in the possession of an Indian. A two-room log cabin was built for the family, which is still occupied and can be seen from Hoover Road, but it is about to be swallowed by a building project. They raised nine children, one of which was an officer in the War of 1812.

(The conclusion of this story in the next blog entry).

Schoch Farm House – Old Stage Coach Stop

(The following was written by Alfred Schoch, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

This neat and pretty farmhouse located on the southeast corner of Big Run Road and Holt Road has been the home of the late Alfred and Carrie Krieger Schoch for over 50 years. The house which is partially log was built sometime before 1900 and was once a stagecoach stop and tavern. The stage came down Big Run Road on the way to London, Ohio. At the time the house consisted of the two front rooms and two rooms upstairs. The stairway went up in the kitchen and you entered from the rear.

In the early days of sandwich in a mug of beer was 5 cents. It was also a good place for the neighboring farmers to come and have some refreshments and fellowship and share the local gossip. Some of the old-timers who frequented were Chris Wetterman and his son Edward, John and Charlie Haenszel, Robert Schoch, and his father and brothers, the Bettinger’s and the Jahns.

In 1914 Mr. William Becker purchased the place and turned it into a residence. Mr. William Gaul who later became Mr. Becker’s son-in-law worked and help remodel the house. The house was enlarged and several rooms added to it. When the house was completed, Mr. Becker had a big party with a dance in the “new house”. All the area friends, neighbors, and relatives were invited. Mr. Becker and his daughters lived there several years before moving down close to Harrisburg Pike. Several farm families rented and farmed the ground until the Schoch’s purchased the farm.