The Old Market Wagon – Part 2

(The following was written by Marilyn Gibboney, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

In the winter it was extremely cold in the side doors were closed and blankets were wrapped around their legs and bodies. Once on the road, the horse knew the way and the driver had a chance to catch a few winks. The distance they drove was about 15 miles and it took more than 3 hours to make the trip. The roads were often muddy and rutted and it was not unusual to drive even further because they could not get through the mud, particularly in the spring. The stand, which they rented for years, was located on S. Fourth Street south of Main Street. They would drive down to the stall, unload the produce and then take the horse and wagon to the livery stable on Cherry Alley.

In later years after the children were older, grandmother had her turn to go to market. This gave her an opportunity to see many friends. Her customers were people who worked in the area, some were business people and others were Columbus residents who wanted fresh country eggs, butter, cheese or whatever was in season.

This day also gave grandmother a chance to visit with other Grove City area friends, go to the dentist, shop, go to the dry goods store and take care of any other business.

The Main Street business district was where she did her shopping. Souder’s restaurant was where everyone ate lunch. Soon after lunch the regular customers had picked up their goods and it was time to pack up to go home again. When grandmother went to market, she would take one of her daughters with her to help her.

The trip home was repeated and they would talk about who they had seen, what was new and share what they had purchased.

In 1952 when plans were made for the Grove City Centennial Mr. William Albright asked grandmother if she still had her Market Wagon. He wanted to drive it in the Centennial parade. She gave her permission and my father made a sign that said “Joe Schlosser’s Market Wagon”. The top wagon was more than 60 years old at the time and made the trip without any problems.

 

The Old Market Wagon – Part 1

(The following was written by Marilyn Gibboney, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

My grandmother Louisa Scholsser and grandfather used a wagon for many years to transport their produce and products to Columbus and “stand on market”.

Cold, hard cash was a rare commodity in the 1890s and early 1900s. The outdoor market located in Columbus gave the farmers of the surrounding area a chance to sell their vegetables, poultry, cheese, berries, fruit, flowers and any other articles they could get together. The harvest time and the times when livestock was sold provided the major source of income but that was only certain times of the year.

My grandparents called their wagon the “Top Wagon” as it had once been just a wagon. Grandfather took this wagon over to Georgesville and Joe Emmelhainz, who was the blacksmith, made the black canvas cover. The front was glassed-in. Two people could ride in the seat and numerous children could ride in the back (no seats though).

During the early years of their marriage grandfather was the one who went to market and sold the produce. Grandmother was the one who gathered and got the produce ready. She was home with all the little ones. Tuesday was their market day, so Monday was very busy and very long. Every Monday night, grandfather would grease all the wagon wheels after the other chores were done. One of the girls would hold a lantern while he did this chore. The two parents would get very soon after midnight and start to ready to produce and get ready to go. Of course there were the other chores to take care of also.

The driving horse had to be curried and fed. They also put in a feed bag for the horse. The time of the year dictated what was taken to market.

(The conclusion of this story in the next blog entry).

Grove City’s First Child

Grove City’s First Child
Amalia (Miller) Voeller – Born June 25, 1853

(The following was written by Agnes Eyerman, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

My grandmother, Amelia (Miller) Voeller, was the first baby born in Grove City after William Breck laid out the first lots. Of course there was already a settlement here before that. She was born June 25, 1853. Mr. Breck offered her parents, Ignatz and Caroline Miller, two city lots if they would name her “City Belle”, but they, staunch Germans that they were, couldn’t conceive of such a name, turned down the offer, and named her Amalia Fredericka instead.

However, he did give her a little dress. My mother said that her grandmother later said that they should have accepted the offer, given her the suggested name, and used the second name, “Belle” in the family circle.

They lived on what is now Columbus Street in the house where to later mayor’s lived, Jim and Bob Evans, and Grove City’s longtime police chief, “Lightning” lived in later years.

The Grant Family – the Grant Homestead – Part 3

(The following was written by Marilyn Gibboney, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author. The “Grant Homestead” is now referred to as the Grant-Sawyer Home, and is available for tours.)

Ruth has many fond memories of growing up on the family farm and enjoys recalling stories told to her by her grandmother. Her grandmother said the Indians often came to the house. There was a bridge at the south end of the rail fence. Gypsies often camped there. She would watch the farmers drive cattle past the house to the railroad station on their way to market. There was a berry patch across the street. The bricks for the house were made on the property. The clay came from the fields and was formed and hand dipped in water, laid on the ground in rows to dry in the sun. They are the same brick still in the house and according to contractors as hard as cement. The bricks for St. John’s Lutheran Church were made on the farm in the year 1888. The kitchen of the house was used as a grainery at one time. The farm animals were watered by the windmill. There was a cistern and hand-dug well. No one had electricity. The neighbors all helped one another at harvest time. At one time the land reached from the former IGA store on the south, west to Moore Avenue, north to Dudley and east to Richard Avenue. Now there are two acres left.

This grant Homestead is living history. A 160 year old home beautifully restored and six generations of ancestors is definitely living history. To quote Ruth when she decided to place the home on the National Register for Historic Places by the Ohio Historical Society she said, “This really is the only thing I can leave to Grove City. It’s important to me to see that this part of our history is preserved.”

Ruth, it has been an honor to be here tonight and be a part of this celebration. On behalf of the Southwest Franklin County Historical Society we thank you again for inviting us all here to be part of this living history of Grove City.

The occasion was the celebration of placing the Grant Homestead on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

The Grant Family – the Grant Homestead – Part 2

(The following was written by Marilyn Gibboney, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author. The “Grant Homestead” is now referred to as the Grant-Sawyer Home, and is available for tours.)

Hugh Grant, Sr., had six children: Alexander, Jacob, Isabelle, Nancy, Mary and Hugh, Jr. This generation of Grants were primarily farmers.

Hugh Grant, Jr. was willed ownership of the property from 1832-1884. During this time frame The farmhouse was built and still stands. Hugh Grant, Jr. was an influential farmer and community leader and held several political positions and was a trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Hugh Grant, Jr. had four children, the most notable of which was Adam Grant, better known as A.G.

A.G. Grant was willed the property from his father in 1884 and claimed it until his death in 1917. A.G. Grant did much for the development of Jackson Township in the village of Grove City. He was industrious and pushed development which brought prosperity to Grove City as it began to change from a small rural area to a growing village. Grant was a contractor and business owner. He had a brick yard, started a bank, developed the west side of town and named it after his daughter Beulah. Beulah Park was named after his daughter. He was a respected civil leader. He was part owner of the Interurban Railway known as The Grove City Electric Railway.

As a civic leader A.G. Grant served as a trustee of the original fair board (1895), donated property to the Grove City School District (1910) on which the Jackson Building on East Park Street still stands. He donated land for a Methodist Church, donated the land (1911) for “Stone Pike” which is now known as Haughn Road.

After Adam (A.G.) Grant died the property was passed down to John Grant and then his daughter Relieffe Grant Sawyer. Relieffe was four years old when she came to live on the property. Relieffe Sawyer, whose husband was Clarence Sawyer, was a farmer and also a blacksmith. Relieffe would sell eggs and other products at the old Central Market on Fourth Street in Columbus. She lived in the house until her death in 1987. Upon her death the property passed to her daughter Ruth Jividen who resides in the house now.

(The conclusion of this story in the next blog entry).

The Grant Family – the Grant Homestead – Part 1

(The following was written by Marilyn Gibboney, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author. The “Grant Homestead” is now referred to as the Grant-Sawyer Home, and is available for tours.)

“Preserving the past for the future” is the motto of the Southwest Franklin County Historical Society. The Grant Homestead is a perfect personification of that motto. Here we are seated and standing on the porch of a house that was built in the middle of the nineteenth century and six generation was later it is still standing and occupied by the descendants of the builder. Before us we have a paved modern street with bicycles, autos, trucks, vans, etc, driving by on a very busy street.

If we step into the back yard we have a completely different scene. Here is a barn that once housed dairy cows, horses that plowed the fields, and old milk house, a dug well that watered all the livestock and family, a chicken house, a windmill and there are also various other farm structures rarely-seen now and certainly not in the city.

Who were these Grants and where did they come from, I would like to tell you a bit of the history of the Grant family and the Grant Homestead.

Hugh Grant, Sr. was a native of Maryland and he came to the area from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania locating first in Ross County. This land was all part of the Virginia Military District, which was land set aside by Congress to reward Revolutionary War veterans for their service to their country. In the late 18th century, Grant left his usual course in Cincinnati during one of his many return trips of selling mill products and began a scouting trip through the undeveloped part of Ohio. Finding the land in the vicinity of present-day Grove City to be very fertile, he made claim to a section of land in what is Jackson Township, which he later purchased. This section was 405 acres. In 1804 Hugh Grant, Sr. arrived by ox cart but was unable to find the exact location and settled nearby.

After his death, his wife Catherine Barr, located the actual site and built a house on ground called the Grant Homestead. It was located on what became known as East Park Street and Haughn Road. Catherine lived there until her death in 1836.

(The continuation of this story in the next blog entry).

The White Family – Part 4

(The following was written by Dexter White, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

An interesting account about the Revolutionary War service of the above-mentioned Sam White indicates he was too young to go with his older brothers into the war, but before the war was over, he finally joined up with an outfit, and was promptly shot at the Battle of Stoney Point, and left for dead on the battlefield, but Sam survived, and at the age of 83 was thrown from a horse at his farm near Big Run, and died of the injuries.

My early years were spent at the White home place on Rt. 665 West of Pleasant Corners, past the farms of the Emmelheinz, Pearl Heath, Shorty Karn, Elvi Trapp, Guthiel, Fritz, and Bill Lambert families. Rt. 665 was not paved under the early 1930s and during the Great Depression years, gasoline was 16 cents per gallon, bread was 9 cents per loaf, many people were out of work. Cars would come past the farm, and deliberately hit a chicken, then the driver would stop, get out, grab the chicken, throw it into the car, and drive away. Many local people were glad to get jobs on WPA.

I learn to swim in Big Darby Creek, just over the hill from Gutheil’s orchard. Several of us boys in the neighborhood would swim there (including Kenny Breckenridge, Art Gutheil, and others) but it seemed that none of us owned a bathing suit. When going to Grove City the back roads went past Jenny’s woods, Mary Butcher’s place, Russ Seymour was just down the road, then across HellBranch between Earl Cummins and John Wahl’s Farms.

In 1944, everything changed. Both of my parents died, I turned 18, was out of high school and then went into the U.S. Army paratroopers for about two years. After 14 parachute jumps, and an honorable discharge, I returned to the area for a while, but nothing was the same.

The White Family – Part 3

(The following was written by Dexter White, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

It was the brother and two grandsons of Alexander White II that were the patriarchs of the three early Grove City area White families. The migration west started soon after the Revolutionary War with Alexander and brother, Sam moving to Hardy County, Virginia in the late 1700s. Many descendants of Sam are still in the area. Next to come to Ohio was William Paxton White, a grandson of Alexander William Paxton arrived in the Grove City area, and married Elizabeth Gantz. She was the first of 14 children of Adam and Catherine Gantz that had settled at the present site of Gantz Park. Alexander II died in Virginia in 1814. His son named George Beavers White had a son named Thomas Benton White that was the third White to migrate to the Grove City area. Thomas B. White married Lydia Gantz, the fifth child of Adam Gantz. The son of Thomas B. was the Edwin White that lived just north of Concord for many years. Dr. A.B. White of Grove City was the son of that Edwin White.

When I was still quite young, I remember the old saying that everyone in Grove City was related to everyone else in Grove City. At that time I did not take it seriously, but after years of research of old census reports, reviewing many books in the State Archives in several states and, looking through the many books written about the early population in this great country of ours, I now realize that, perhaps the old saying had some credence.

(The conclusion of this story in the next blog entry).

The White Family – Part 2

(The following was written by Dexter White, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

Dexter G. White married Laura Jane Clark in Grove City in 1876. Laura was the daughter of Henry Clark of Grove City. The Clark family had lived in Jackson and Pleasant townships as well as Darby Township just south of Harrisburg since before 1800. Henry Clark’s wife was Emily Miller, daughter of Henry and Catherine Miller of Harrisburg. The Millers had come to this country from Germany about 1830, and Henry had gone by the name of Heinrich Mueller in the old country.

My paternal grandfather, Dexter Gantz white, after being born in 1851 and married in 1876 in Grove City, the 1880 census shows him as a living in Jacktown, where he was running a general store. Soon after 1880, he moved to Union County, Illinois, and that is where my father was born. About 1890, Dexter G. moved to Wayne County, Illinois, and then in the mid 1890s came back to Ohio, and lived in a house by the railroad tracks south of Pleasant Corners, at the time of the 1900 census. His wife had died in 1889, and is buried at Concord, as are a lot of the people named in this report. His wife had a sister then was Mrs. Shane Walton. She also died young. Shortly after the 1900 census Dexter G. White sold out in Ohio, packed up the kids and hit the Oregon Trail, never to return to Ohio. He died in Oregon in 1983. Three of his children did return to Ohio within a few years. First was Della White–she married John Mulvaney, and returned. They were the parents of Elvin Mo Mulvaney and Wayne Mulvaney. Second was Charles D. White, he came back prior to 1913, and married Myrtle Ruth Francis. Third was Mary Edith White, she came back and married Jack Davis, he ran the Davis General Store in Harrisburg, and had one daughter, Harriet. Harriet married Bob Greuser.

William Paxton White, the father of Dexter G. White had been born in Virginia in 1824, and migrated to Ohio in the 1840s. He was the son of William Wellington White and wife, Rachel Paxton, both born in New Jersey, and moved to Virginia while still quite young. William W. White had been born in New Jersey in 1784, and was the son of the second Alexander White and wife, Mary Beavers Clifford. Mary was the daughter of Colonel Joseph Beavers of New Jersey and had been married before.

It was this Alexander White that had been a captain in the Revolutionary War, and had paid his men from his own funds, with the promise from the Continental Congress that they would repay him after the war (220 years later, they still have not repaid). He was the son of the first Alexander white, (born MA 1709) and wife Mary McMurtrie, (born MA 1711). The IGI file indicates that Alexander I was the son of Jonathon White (born MA 1653) and his second wife, Margaret Elizabeth Alexander (born MA 1670). Jonathon White was the son of Peregrine White (born on the Mayflower in Cape Cod Bay in November 1620). Peregrine was the son of William White, the pilgrim, signer of the Mayflower Compact.

(The continuation of this story in the next blog entry).

The White Family – Part 1

(The following was written by Dexter White, and is reprinted from “Reflections II”, a collection of local stories available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

The old farm house where I was born, just south of Pleasant Corners, burned a few years ago, but whenever I go back in that area, I have memories of the Great Depression era in which I grew up.

Driving south from Pleasant Corners looking to the left side of the old 3C Highway, I see the place where Louie Zielgenspeck once lived. Then there is the house where Jake and Minnie Miller lived, with their daughter, Ellen Jane. Next is the house where Carl Miller lived, that is where the William H. Nichols family had lived before him. Next is where the house once stood that was the home of George Francis following his arrival from England in the late 1830s.

George Francis and his wife Ann (Walter) brought their young son, Frederick with them to this country. George was one of the highly educated citizens in the area, and served as census Taker, and in a number of other capacities in the community.

Following the death of George Francis, his son Frederick and wife Elizabeth (Heath) lived in the homestead, and raised their large family there. Their fourth child was Charles Francis, born September 15, 1862. He was my maternal grandfather. Charles Francis and his wife Mary Ellen Nichols moved into that house following the death of Frederick Francis in about 1912, and it was there, in the house on the old Francis farm that I was born in 1926.

My father was Charles D. White, and he married my mother, Myrtle Ruth Francis in March 1913. My mother was the second of three daughters of Charles Francis.

While attending grade school at Harrisburg and high school at Grove City, I was actually attending school with quite a few kids that were related to me, but I did not know it at the time. My father, Charles D. White was born in Union County, Illinois on July 14, 1884. His father was Dexter Gantz White, born in Grove City, Ohio in 1851, the son of William Paxton White, and wife, Elizabeth Gantz. That White family had lived across Rt. 665 from the old Ferguson home place. That house still stands.

(The continuation of this story in the next blog entry).