The Epoch of the Park Street School – Before Ohio Part 1

(The following was written by Faye and Harold Morland, and is reprinted from “The Epoch of the Park Street School 1853-1964 and Grove City, Ohio”.  Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

The birth and growth of a community of people in all phases of life necessarily causes the birth and growth of schools for learning how to live a better life. Let us explore the land, history and development of the region before Grove City and Park Street School existed.

The first explorations by the Europeans into Ohio were made by the French, LaSalle dating from 1667. The territory was in dispute with the English. By the Treaty of 1763, the French assigned the “Great West” to the English. In 1779, George Rogers Clark, in behalf of Virginia, wrested control of the region known as the Northwest Territory from the English. The English relinquished their right and interest in the Northwest Territory by the Treaty of Paris in 1783.

The states of Virginia, New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts made claims based on charters granted by Kings of England to portions of the territory northwest of the Ohio River. These states relinquished their rights to the United States. New states could then be formed and admitted to the union when the population warranted. This plan was adopted with the exception of Virginia and Connecticut.

(The conclusion of this story in the next blog entry).

Town with a Future – The Grove City Farmers Exchange Co.

(The following was written by Lewis Garrison, and is reprinted from 1927’s “Grove City – The Town with a Future”,  available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.

Town with a Future – The Grove City Farmers Exchange Co.

This is without doubt the oldest business enterprise in Grove City, being known over 60 years ago as the old Breck saw and Grist Mill. It was successively owned by various parties down to late years when George Gantz made of it a more or less first class small town mill and elevator. Several owners had the business subsequently, more particularly Esley Brothers and later Charles Esley. On February 18, 1921, fire destroyed the mill in storage room. Prior to this date the above title corporation was formed and after the fire the old premises were acquired from Charles Esley. Then began the erection of the present large and modern concrete elevator with a capacity of over 21,000 bushels of grain. Today with the feed mill equipment and other buildings the company have one of the best places of the kind in this section. There are over 150 stockholders in the company, nearly all of them are farmers in the surrounding territory. The business is prosperous and growing. The lines engaged in are the buying and selling of grain, flour, feed, salt, coal, fencing, tile, etc. Mr. Samuel Horn is the manager. The officers of the corporation are: R.M. Borror, President; William Koehler, Vice-President; Harry Linebaugh, Secretary, and M.R. Miller, Treasurer.

 

Town with a Future – The Grove City Manufacturing Co.

(The following was written by Lewis Garrison, and is reprinted from 1927’s “Grove City – The Town with a Future”,  available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.

Town with a Future – The Grove City Manufacturing Co.

Incorporated three years ago and is managed by Ira Maxson. Building contracting is the chief business, the mill equipment being such as to facilitate the manufacturing of finished lumber, frames, sash, and other mill work. Dwellings are constructed on contract locally, as well as in Columbus. Some recent buildings are a large double on South Burgess and a single on South Terrace, Hill Top, Columbus.

Town with a Future – Gibson Park Place

(The following was written by Lewis Garrison, and is reprinted from 1927’s “Grove City – The Town with a Future”,  available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.

Town with a Future – Gibson Park Place

This new edition is being advanced by the American Building and Realty Company, located at 511 Chamber of Commerce Building, Columbus. The tract consists of 100 acres platted into 500 lots and is located on the Harrisburg Pike just a short distance from the intersection of Mound Street and Central Avenue. It is within walking distance of the city street car service with five fare and universal transfer. The Grove City traction line stops at the addition. Besides this service, five excellently paved streets lead direct to the state house with no grade crossings and less traffic to encounter than any section of the city. Already a number of homes have been built and other homes are under construction. A rapid growth is anticipated during the coming spring. Gibson Park Place is partially woodland and an ideal home site. This addition is under the management of Mr. E.C. Slack, who has an office at his home, No. 1036 Harrisburg Pike.

Town with a Future – Grossman and Flach, Grocers

(The following was written by Lewis Garrison, and is reprinted from 1927’s “Grove City – The Town with a Future”,  available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

Town with a Future – Grossman and Flach, Grocers

This firm commenced business here about ten years ago in premises on the opposite side of the street from where they are now located. After about nine years, and in 1922, they purchased the property on Broadway and built the single-story brick building which they now occupy. Groceries and meats are the lines carried. Their business has grown and is in a prosperous condition. The firm is composed of Otto G. Grossman and William C. Flach, who were born and raised in this locality.

Town with a Future – Hensel Brothers

(The following was written by Lewis Garrison, and is reprinted from 1927’s “Grove City – The Town with a Future”,  available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

Town with a Future – Hensel Brothers

The above-named partnership is composed of Edward and Otto Hensel, engaged in trucking, milk hauling and ice business. They commenced operations on August 1st three years ago. Their place of business is at the center of Broadway and Grove City Pike. At the corner of the street intersection there is now being erected a modern filling station for the sale of the high-grade products of the Capital City Oil Company, in which company they are stockholders. General truck hauling is done, besides they collect milk for five different milk companies and two creameries in Columbus and traverse a radius of 15 miles in this industry. They also handle ice in this section for the City Ice & Fuel Company. Coupled with the business is a battery service, and in this department three well-known makes of batteries are handled, including the Willard, Cole and Exide.

Town with a Future – Mulzer’s Garage

(The following was written by Lewis Garrison, and is reprinted from 1927’s “Grove City – The Town with a Future”,  available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

Town with a Future – Mulzer’s Garage

This is the Ford agency, handling Ford and Lincoln cars and Fordson tractors. In the three years of business 850 cars have been delivered. It is the largest and most complete service station in central Ohio. Leslie G. Mulzer is President and general manager.

Town with a Future – Grossman Hardware Co.

(The following was written by Lewis Garrison, and is reprinted from 1927’s “Grove City – The Town with a Future”,  available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

Town with a Future – Grossman Hardware Co.

Mr. H.G. Grossman is the proprietor of the above-named business which is located in the business center of Grove City. It was established by Elias A. White, father-in-law of the proprietor, in the 90s, and is the oldest hardware store in the community. Seven years ago the business was taken over by William C. and H.G. Grossman, and since last February has been owned and controlled by the present proprietor. A full line is carried of general hardware, farm implements, builders’ hardware, stoves, ranges, furnaces, pains, oils, glass, coal, lime and cement. The coal yard is equipped with its own spur, giving excellent facilities for the handling of building materials and coal. The business has been built on quality merchandise and courteous treatment to customers. Mr. Grossman has lived in the community practically all of his life.

Town with a Future – Johnston and Grant

(The following was written by Lewis Garrison, and is reprinted from 1927’s “Grove City – The Town with a Future”,  available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

Johnston and Grant

Mr. S.E. Johnston started in the coal business about 1890 and is the oldest established business here. The coal yard is located on the B. and O. Between Park Street and Grove City Pike. He was formerly a school teacher and taught in Grove City and vicinity for five years. Seeing the opportunity for a business of his own he started as above noted. The business grew and a few years later A.G. Grant, now deceased, entered into partnership with him and the grain business was added. This business was conducted successfully until recent years. After the death of Mr. Grant, a son, Jesse R. Grant, took over his father’s interest and is still active in the business. Later were added the lines of lumber, building material and supplies, builders hardware, etc.

Town with a Future – Witteman and Miller, Coal and Feed

(The following was written by Lewis Garrison, and is reprinted from 1927’s “Grove City – The Town with a Future”,  available at the Grove City Welcome Center and Museum. Any opinions made in the article are from the author.)

Witteman and Miller, Coal and Feed

This firm is composed of Ollie Witteman and Otto Miller, and has been in existence about seven years. Their yard and feed Store are located on West Grant Street at the B. and O. tracks. They occupy a brick building 40 by 8 feet in size for the storage of feed and building supplies, and the yard extends with a 140 feet Frontage on Grant Street and has a side track accommodation for eight cars. All of this property is owned by the partnership. In the yards are stored the coal and building supplies such as sewer pipe, lining and brick. The business was started in a small way and it’s grown with the development of the town. Mr. Witteman was born and raised in Grove City and Mr. Miller came from a farm nearby.